1. Maximizing comprehensible Input

Our method is supported by the Comprehensible Input Hypothesis by Dr Stephen Krashen (Prof. Emeritus USC). Simply put, comprehensible input is new-language input that can be comprehended by listeners despite them not understanding all the words.

Dr. Krashen’s work shows that the amount of comprehensible input a person is exposed is the single most important factor in new-language acquisition.

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2. Magical Window

We believe that this is particularly effective during what we call the ‘magical window’ of early childhood, when the plasticity of the brain means it wires much more readily to languages to which it is exposed.

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3. Affective Filter

Most existing products have a traditional grammar-based approach that focuses on memorization and testing of vocabulary lists and rules. This routine generates stress and raises what Dr. Krashen refers to as an ‘affective filter’ in the brain which impairs the ability to acquire a second language.  

Basically, input-oriented activities like reading and listening (so long as they are generally understood) are a much more effective way of acquiring new languages than grammar-oriented or output-oriented activities.  

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Valeria Riera